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Shock o-ring sizes

Skynet5

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Anyone know the sizes of the o-rings and other inserts.

Want to get a supply and perhaps avoid Tekno versions, as for some of their stuff (screws etc) are a little rich for something that should be cheap.

Don't have any to hand to measure.
 
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Billl DeLong

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I recommend rebuilding your car every 20-25 battery packs through it, applying fresh grease on all the seals, re-packing grease in the bearings after removing the rubber seals and rebuilding the shock cartridges. If you do this then chances are you will never need to replace a single bearing, nor seal nor ever worry about a bearing seizing which can melt the plastic in a hub carrier which can cause premature bearing failure which can cascade to other premature failures.

If you want to save a small fortune, then be sure to replace the pins on your drive shafts at the first hint of any flat spots forming and you'll never have to replace any of your out drives nor shafts again:

Pin Replacement Tools

"Hardened Pins" are the way to go, while they are more expensive up front, they will save you money/hassle down the road, I highly recommend the pins from RC Renew!
 

Skynet5

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Thanks mate.

I've got myself a pin replacement tool already and some hudy pins. Although I wasn't sure when I should replace them. Good shout, I guess the flatter they become the more friction and rub on the outdrives.

I just expected shock o rings to fail, maybe I should just be careful pulling them out on the assumption I'm reusing them rather than replacing.
 

Billl DeLong

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The only o-rings that need to be pulled out are from the shock cartridge and diffs, simply use the shock shaft to pry them out, where they should be well lubricated assuming you're properly maintaining the car. If you haven't greased the o-rings in ages and the shocks/diffs have run dry, and consequently dried up the o-rings, then yes they will likely have been torn/damaged... it all comes down to proper maintenance ;)

Sometimes a diff might be empty and that might happen if the screws for the crown gear worked loose, if this is a recurring problem, then chances are it's time to replace the plastic diff case, especially if any of the screw threads have stripped out!
 

Nicochau

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I have noticed those o rings do quite well and will not replace them every rebuild. I’ll measure one for you.
 

Skynet5

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I've quickly concluded that the effort of cleaning and reoiling bearings is not worth my time.

At 80p a bearing from rcbearings.co.uk I'd rather toss them on a regular interval.
 

Billl DeLong

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the link you provided shows they are out of business, I can't estimate what they are charging for a full set

however, a full set of 18 bearings for my SCT410.3 costs $26 from AVID:
https://www.avidrc.com/flexkit/?kit=1443&kitname=SCT410.3

It takes me about an hour to clean/re-pack a set of bearings which makes it worth the $26/hr savings.

The key is having a system to make it manageable.

I keep a full second set at the ready to make the rebuild go as quick as possible, then I clean/pack the bearings the following night to spread out my bench time.

1) Pop out all rubber seals, carefully placing each size into a different pile - 10-15 min
2) Soak bearings in Berryman's Chem Dip - 20-30 min
3) Use a terry cloth to wipe grime off the seals - do this while the bearings are soaking, no added time
4) Use air compressor to blow bearings dry - 5-10 min
5) Pack fresh grease into bearings with a syringe and snap seals in place - 10-15 min

Do everything assembly line style, especially when packing the bearings, apply grease to all bearings, then snap all the seals on, don't snap seals between each bearing because you waste time picking up and putting down the syringe, etc...

*** I used to use brake cleaner to flush my bearings but found it too expensive, chem dip + air compressor is the most cost effective method I have found :)
 

Nicochau

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the link you provided shows they are out of business, I can't estimate what they are charging for a full set

however, a full set of 18 bearings for my SCT410.3 costs $26 from AVID:
https://www.avidrc.com/flexkit/?kit=1443&kitname=SCT410.3

It takes me about an hour to clean/re-pack a set of bearings which makes it worth the $26/hr savings.

The key is having a system to make it manageable.

I keep a full second set at the ready to make the rebuild go as quick as possible, then I clean/pack the bearings the following night to spread out my bench time.

1) Pop out all rubber seals, carefully placing each size into a different pile - 10-15 min
2) Soak bearings in Berryman's Chem Dip - 20-30 min
3) Use a terry cloth to wipe grime off the seals - do this while the bearings are soaking, no added time
4) Use air compressor to blow bearings dry - 5-10 min
5) Pack fresh grease into bearings with a syringe and snap seals in place - 10-15 min

Do everything assembly line style, especially when packing the bearings, apply grease to all bearings, then snap all the seals on, don't snap seals between each bearing because you waste time picking up and putting down the syringe, etc...

*** I used to use brake cleaner to flush my bearings but found it too expensive, chem dip + air compressor is the most cost effective method I have found :)
I do that too. With multiple rigs, the cost adds up. You can clean bearings multiple time before they wear out or damage the seals.
 

Skynet5

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They're open. I think it's just a family business and they're on their holidays so close the store front.

They charge £18 for a full bearing set.

I will look again at cleaning them. As you're right , production line doing many at at time clearly makes sense.

Just got to find stuff in the uk that people use.

Acetone has been mentioned for cleaning, but I'd prefer friendlier stuff.
 

Billl DeLong

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You can soak the bearings in a tray filled with motor oil, that will loosen the gunk some, but Chem Dip will make less work and does a better job of cleaning the bearings, I'll bet there is someone selling a similar product in the UK:

https://www.walmart.com/ip/B-9-Chem-Dip-Parts-Cleaner-w-Basket-and-Armlock/226784113

If you really want to make it easy to clean the bearings then I have heard this is best way to do it, but I have not invested in one yet:
https://www.walmart.com/ip/VEVOR-3L...teel-Industry-Heated-Heater-w-Timer/413808279
 

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