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Soldering!

Ifti

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Looking at picking up the following soldering iron for soldering up my esc/motor/battery connectors etc. Would you say it is up to the task, as it comes with different tips, so I would use the 3mm tip for my uses.....

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B07G99X9G6/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?smid=A2NRY4HOWAHJOF&psc=1

Also when it comes to solder, I understand Lead-free with Rosin Core is best??

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B07VFZDJX2/ref=ox_sc_act_title_2?smid=A2NRY4HOWAHJOF&psc=1

The solder melts at 240-250c - so I would need to set the soldering iron to this heat??
Sorry, Im new to soldering!
 

Billl DeLong

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TBuggy

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I set my iron to about 780F, which is approximately 420C;) That iron says it is capable of those temps, so it should do great.

I prefer to use 60/40 lead solder like Bill suggests as well.
 
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Ifti

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Ah, I though lead free was best. Will have a look at the 60/40.
Thanks again guys!
 
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Billl DeLong

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I tried lead-free solder once and it was a real pain, far more likely to melt your plastic plugs when trying to solder with a 60W iron... it might be possible to get better results with lead-free solder with a higher wattage iron, but I was too cheap to buy a new iron, ha!
 

Ifti

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Thanks guys all ordered up!

Now the wait for everything to be delivered! lol
 

ReMiXeDg

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Good to hear you got it order when doing the job take your time and try to always have your tip clean. Watch some videos on youtube if you haven't done so already and you can see what people been / do to make the job go as easy as possible.
 

Nicochau

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If you solder connectors, get a quality one like Amass XT90.

When soldering, you want to keep male and female plugged. It reduces the risk of melting the plastic around the connectors.
 

Ifti

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If you solder connectors, get a quality one like Amass XT90.

When soldering, you want to keep male and female plugged. It reduces the risk of melting the plastic around the connectors.
Yes I'll be going with XT90's.
Watched a couple of YouTube videos on soldering them, and they do recommend keeping them plugged as you stated too ;)
Thanks for the tip!
 

Ifti

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Best to use chisel tip or the flat tip??

using 60/40 Rosin Core solder as suggested, should I set my iron to 400c?......

First time soldering since doing electronics in my school days! lol
 

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Billl DeLong

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chisel (see post#2 above)... needs to be at least the same width as the diameter of the wire you are soldering, flat tip will not be able to heat both sides that need to be soldered together which would be useless for our needs, however a flat tip could be used to de-solder a wire, but might as well use the chisel tip regardless
 

Ifti

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chisel (see post#2 above)... needs to be at least the same width as the diameter of the wire you are soldering, flat tip will not be able to heat both sides that need to be soldered together which would be useless for our needs, however a flat tip could be used to de-solder a wire, but might as well use the chisel tip regardless
Makes sense!
Thanks!
 

devnull

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I set my iron to about 780F, which is approximately 420C;) That iron says it is capable of those temps, so it should do great.

I prefer to use 60/40 lead solder like Bill suggests as well.
I tend to solder at a similar temperature (although it really depends on what I'm soldering, and I've soldered some pretty small items over the last few years), but I don't use leaded solder. I've been using Kester 60/40 Rosin core solder for the last several years, and really never used leaded solder, or at least not within the last 10 or so years. Once you develop a technique it's pretty good solder.

I'd recommend soldering in a well ventilated area or get a fan with a charcoal filter. You really don't want to be breathing the fumes, be it rosin core or leaded.

Something to keep in mind insofar as soldering irons are concerned is their ability to not only reach a temperature, but maintain it. Once you start working on something, heat is extracted from the solder tip and the soldering iron has to restore that temperature in a fairly efficient manner otherwise it can affect your work. If your iron takes a long time to reach temperature, it's reasonable to think that it's not going to maintain that temp very well once you start slinging solder. It will affect your ability to heat things quickly, which is important in soldering -- especially so when you're dealing with larger gauge wires.
 

TBuggy

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I tend to solder at a similar temperature (although it really depends on what I'm soldering, and I've soldered some pretty small items over the last few years), but I don't use leaded solder. I've been using Kester 60/40 Rosin core solder for the last several years, and really never used leaded solder, or at least not within the last 10 or so years. Once you develop a technique it's pretty good solder.

I'd recommend soldering in a well ventilated area or get a fan with a charcoal filter. You really don't want to be breathing the fumes, be it rosin core or leaded.

Something to keep in mind insofar as soldering irons are concerned is their ability to not only reach a temperature, but maintain it. Once you start working on something, heat is extracted from the solder tip and the soldering iron has to restore that temperature in a fairly efficient manner otherwise it can affect your work. If your iron takes a long time to reach temperature, it's reasonable to think that it's not going to maintain that temp very well once you start slinging solder. It will affect your ability to heat things quickly, which is important in soldering -- especially so when you're dealing with larger gauge wires.
60/40 means that it is 60% tin and 40% lead FYI. ;)
 

devnull

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60/40 means that it is 60% tin and 40% lead FYI. ;)
Hah! Well, it seems I HAVE been using leaded solder over the last 10 years!

For whatever reason, I, in my clueless state, had confused some of the things I've read about Kester's products into thinking I was using a lead free variant. Although it's somewhat embarrasing -- although the older I get the less I'm concerned about that, I'm glad you pointed this out, Tbug.

Nonetheless -- ya don't wanna breathe that stuff! The precautions I've taken over the last few years were more important than I thought.

I guess that explains how it's a fairly easy to work with solder. I'm gonna have to chase down that leadless solder hole now. Although I have a fairly large amount on the spool of the 60/40 I have left. Probably won't need anything for a while.
 

TBuggy

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Hah! Well, it seems I HAVE been using leaded solder over the last 10 years!

For whatever reason, I, in my clueless state, had confused some of the things I've read about Kester's products into thinking I was using a lead free variant. Although it's somewhat embarrasing -- although the older I get the less I'm concerned about that, I'm glad you pointed this out, Tbug.

Nonetheless -- ya don't wanna breathe that stuff! The precautions I've taken over the last few years were more important than I thought.

I guess that explains how it's a fairly easy to work with solder. I'm gonna have to chase down that leadless solder hole now. Although I have a fairly large amount on the spool of the 60/40 I have left. Probably won't need anything for a while.
No matter the solder you use I agree it should be done in a well ventilated area.

Side note; The smoke produced while soldering is from the flux and not the lead. Lead does not evaporate.

Lead-free solders are available but they are a little trickier to work with and typically have higher melting points. If not careful you could overheat electronics because of this.
 

Skynet5

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That soldering kit looks pefect!
Just make sure that you use a chisel tip that is at least the same width as the diameter of the wire you are soldering and you will do fine.

I like to use 60/40 lead solder myself, it melts quicker and will be less likely to damage any electronics you are working with.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Kaina-Welding-Solder-Soldering-Aluminum/dp/B085DKB3P7/ref=sr_1_36?dchild=1&keywords=60/40+rosin+core+solder&qid=1586702536&s=diy&sr=1-36&th=1
That link actually says its lead free.

Trying to find leaded solder is tough. Screwfix in the UK have some, but it's 3mm thick.
 

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